WHAT GOES INTO A GARAGE DOOR?

By Creative Door in Edmonton

It’s easy to choose a garage door for its vanity value. But a closer look at the materials that go into the making of it, could show how we might be better off choosing one for its R-value, or its durability in coastal weather conditions like those found in Kelowna and Vancouver. Read on to discover what a difference a gauge makes.

STEEL

Durable and able to handle extreme temperatures, this is the muscular workhorse of garage doors. These can be insulated, made with a single-layer of steel or two layers of 24-gauge galvanized steel for superior strength, and can be imprinted with wood grain texture.

ALUMINUM

Lighter and more affordable than steel, aluminum panels are often used for commercial overhead doors. However, the frame on our residential Modern Glass Doors is constructed of aluminum, and the finish can be anodized (to resist corrosion) or powder coated in a variety of colours.

WOOD

A solid wood door adds a luxurious touch to your home. The Wayne Dalton Carriage House Doors (7000 Series) offers a choice of cedar (resists insects and rot), hemlock (perfect for painting), or mahogany (naturally weather-resistant), and are hand-built by Amish craftsmen and other wood artisans. Or there’s the Richards-Wilcox Contemporary Rockwood Series that uses wood veneer over insulated steel for beauty and brawn.

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COPPER

Chic and enduring, this beguiling material complements every style of home. The Martin Door Copper Elite Series is made of 99.9% pure copper backed by galvanized steel for durability, and the natural patina that develops means it gets better with age.

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GLASS

A glass garage door lends an unparalleled contemporary edge. Panels can be set in a visible aluminum frame for a clean contemporary look (see our Richards-Wilcox Styleview Series), or float on an invisible platform for a sleek seamless look (see our Wayne Dalton Luminous Doors).

FIBERGLASS

The chameleon of the bunch, fiberglass is a sturdy composite that convincingly mimics the look of natural materials such as wood grain—without warping or cracking. Wayne Dalton Designer Fiberglass Doors offer the look of oak, cherry, or mahogany, and come in a variety of stains.

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VINYL

Durability meets affordability. Vinyl garage doors are ideal if your view involves sand, salt, and wind. It’s long-lasting, resists wear, and is available in many colours. The downside? It’s long-lasting, and can’t be easily re-painted, so you’ll want to be sure about the colour upfront.

WINDOWS

Garage door windows can be single or double-pane (for insulation and noise reduction) with glass that can be clear, tinted, etched, pebbled, tempered, or coated with a Low-E metal oxide that repels the sun’s heat. What’s more, they don’t have to be glass at all; they can be acrylic.

INSULATION

Garage doors and windows have the option to be insulated. A garage door cavity can be filled with polyurethane or polystyrene for superior insulation. As well, double-pane windows can be filled with argon gas for even more insulation and higher R-value.

What if you have glass garage doors? Well, no doubt, your R-value won’t be as high as a foam-insulated steel door, but it doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice style for comfort. Wayne Dalton Model 8800 Modern Glass Doors offer the option to have the aluminum rails and stiles of the frame filled with polyurethane for better thermal protection.

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For more insight into the manufacturing of a garage door, this Discovery Channel “How it’s Made” episode offers a short but fascinating look at how Garaga doors are made.

Creative Door partners with best-in-class suppliers including Richards-WilcoxWayne DaltonGaraga, and LiftMaster, among others, to ensure quality materials and excellent workmanship. Contact us at any one of our eight locations for a free quote.

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